Summary – June 27, 2014

Summary – June 27, 2014

The bad news:

1. Uncertainty, or rather, the incomprehensibility of the ceasefire.

In the next few hours the President of Ukraine will decide whether to extend an essentially completely unilateral pause in the armed confrontation, or allow ATO forces to take appropriate actions.

During the ceasefire, we lost over 20 of our children, our soldiers who were killed by terrorists. If the ceasefire is extended, we have the right to know for what purpose. If it is only because of the EU’s promises to finally introduce long-promised sanctions starting June 30th if Putin doesn’t rest–then at first we must understand whether we generally believe the EU in this regard.

I really want to believe that the truce will finally give some positive results. But while there are none so far, it’s difficult to consider this a positive pause, with good intentions…

2. Today the ATO forces captured a terrorist tank. They checked its [serial or registration] numbers–it turned out that the tank is from Russia. Who would doubt it.

Where is the firewood from? Clearly, it came from across the border. We, the IR group, from the very beginning of the ceasefire declared that we didn’t share the optimism of the security forces regarding control of the state border with Russia. Now the security forces themselves have gradually started talking about it.

One thing is clear: with the end of the ceasefire the issue of the border closure should be one of the first. Whatever desire for peace Putin has sworn, until Ukraine cuts off all the channels of weapons and mercenary supplies from Russia at Donbas, we will not see the success of the ATO.

3. Today, editors of the Putin newspaper Vesti in Ukraine broke out with an indignant statement. That is, they presented “balanced information,” and for this they are almost being pursued in Ukraine.

According to Vesti, the full legalization of “DNR” and “LNR” [Donetsk- and Luhansk People’s Republics] (they present these terrorist organizations as if they were really some kind of “People’s Republics”); naming insurgents who kill-rob-rape for a salary from Putin as no different from “militias,” and an amazing loyalty to terrorism in general, is “balanced information.”

Gentleman from Vesti, who consider yourselves journalists, I appeal to you. In any self-respecting country, you would simply be lynched for such open enemy propaganda. Kiss the Ukrainian flag for the night, and rejoice that Ukraine is a surprisingly soft and toothless state. Unacceptably soft, considering that there is a war [launched] by your beloved Russia against the country in which you are generously tolerated.

The good news:

1. The signing of the second part of the Association [Agreement] with the EU.

Unlike sanctions against Russia, at least here old Mother Europe has not let [us] down.

I’d like to believe that Ukraine, to the fullest measure, is making use of the opened window of opportunity. For its own growth, and for the welfare of every Ukrainian.

If we do not waste these opportunities, and use them in full–the our future prosperity will be the best campaign for a unified and great Ukraine.

2. The Prosecutor General’s Office reported today that Defense Ministry officials involved in the theft and sale of the U.S. MREs that were supposed to be delivered to the ATO zone, had been caught in the act. Three such cases have already been recorded.

The shenanigans with the MREs are a drop in the sea of corruption. But, the more such “drops” are cut short, the sooner the sea will wither.

3. While the ceasefire was in effect, ATO forces also wasted no time. According to our data, a number of measures that will significantly improve the efficiency of our operations were taken.

Our military are ready to continue cleansing the land of Donbas of pro-Russian and Russian vermin. It is up to the decision of the Commander-in-Chief.

[Editor's update: President Poroshenko announced an extension of another 72 hours to the ceasefire].

Dmitry Tymchuk, Coordinator, Information Resistance

Translated and edited by Voices of Ukraine